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EMILY HOLT was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis at the age of 23.

An art student, she was specialising in Technical Art Interpretations and Special Effects at Wimbledon College of Arts.

Art became a way to process and make sense of her MS diagnosis. Her final project, which won her the 1999 BBC TV Design Award, was a sculpture blending a female and damselfly body together.

‘’I wanted to explore the idea of transformation, what it might feel like to be two forms inhabiting one body.’’

Fast forward two decades later… and Emily is living with MS fatigue and neurological pain. She is losing the use of her arms, hands, legs, bodily functions, swallowing, sight and her voice.

Her mother tells us that Emily is a clear example of ‘’determination on wheels’’.

Emily’s most recent work is a film called The Virus Diariesa no holds barred account of her time shielding from Covid-19. Her 16-person production team included her mum and sister (on Skype) and the Personal Assistant Staff at Compass Homecare.

Expect dramatic flashbacks, iconic scenes from Ghost and a detailed explanation of what ventilation actually involves.

Ed Holloway, Director of Services at the MS Society, said: “Emily’s film provides a moving insight into the reality of shielding as an extremely clinically vulnerable person. It’s brilliant that she is using her experiences to highlight the challenges that people with MS have faced over the past year.’’

We seriously recommend giving it a watch and sharing it!

PICTURED: Celebration time … Emily and her family